Recommended supplements

A measure of safety is to look for the designation “USP” on the label. A multivitamin that meets the requirements of the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) meets the standards and ensures the product is pure and actually contains the listed ingredients. For information about supplements, https://examine.com is a must-read before buying any product. – Multivitamin Dose: 1 serving Purpose: Cover any potential nutrient deficiencies You don’t need to go expensive here. Look for products that have close to 100% RDA on most vitamins and minerals. Avoid ones that have too little or too much (common in bodybuilding brands). Pay specific attention to Vitamin K, Magnesium, Calcium and Zinc, which is what most people lack. If you’re a woman, make sure it has a good amount of Iron. And if you’re a men, make sure it doesn’t have too much. – Vitamin D3 Dose: 2000-5000+ UI (depending on sun exposure) Purpose: Eliminate Vitamin D3 deficiency (which is almost inevitable without supplementation) If you can, take a blood test to see what your vitamin D levels are. Your blood levels should be between 35-40 ng/ml. As a general rule, it takes 100 IU (2.5 mcg) of Vitamin D per day to raise levels by 1 ng/mL. If you want a more accurate calculation, you can use this: http://www.vitamindservice.com/node/87. It’s still not a perfect formula as different people metabolize the vitamin differently, but it’s a good guide. If you can, take it with 100 mcg of Vitamin K2 as MK-7, or look for a product that has both. This is recommended but not critical. – Fish oil (Omega 3) Dose: 2-3g of combined...

Alcohol & Performance

Alcohol: the most popular drug on the planet. Likely loved for its anxiety-reducing effect, there are records of its use as far back as 10,000 BC, and it’s estimated that on average, each adult consumes approximately 4.3 L of pure alcohol per year. People have called it the 4th macro. It provides your body with 7 calories per gram, but because it isn’t essential for survival it’s not typically mentioned alongside protein, fat, and carbs, as it’s not commonly found in food. Alcohol has no nutritional value aside from proving calories. From this alone, alcohol doesn’t seem a great choice for health nor performance. You’re consuming calories without any vitamins, minerals or fiber. This is especially problematic if you’re dieting or struggle to keep your caloric intake low. Also, alcohol is often drunk at social events (which already promote overeating by themselves). Alcohol affects not only hunger but impulse control as well. Being even mildly intoxicated makes you more prone to go off-track on your diet, and consume more calories than you should. Studies show that alcohol intake blunts fat burning, and it’s considered fat promoting by the general population. However, alcohol by itself doesn’t make you fat. The body simply considers it a poison and has priority for metabolism. It suppresses fat oxidation, but also carb and protein oxidation. During the time alcohol is being burnt, nothing is happening, and none of the alcohol gets stored. Some may argue this is bad since we could have burnt fat during this period, but such short time frames have little relevance when considering net fat gain or loss at the end of...

Calories and macros mismatch

I get this question a lot from people who recently started to track their calories and macro-nutrients: Why don’t my macros equal my calories? Carbs and protein contain 4 calories per gram, and fat contains 9. So if you consumed, for example, 20g of protein, 30g of carbs, and 10g of fat, you should have consumed 290 calories (Protein: 4 x 20 = 80, Carbs: 4 x 30 = 120, and Fat: 9 x 10 = 90). But a lot of times, the math doesn’t end up right. It might say you consumed 250 or 300 calories, so what gives? There’s several possible causes: 1) Everything in nutritional labels are rounded, therefore, it has a slight margin of error. On top of that, many websites (like MyFitnessPal), also round their own numbers. So by rounding it twice, when you add a lot of food and items, that error can become significant enough to be noticeable. 2) Sometimes insoluble fiber isn’t counted. Some products and some countries don’t list insoluble fiber in the total amount of calories because it’s not absorbed. So that will throw the carb/calorie math off. 3) The numbers on a specific food are wrong. This is quite common in websites like MyFitnessPal, where the database of the foods is created from the users themselves. This means that if the user introduced the nutritional information wrong, you’re using the wrong numbers. So what should you do about it? For the most part: nothing. For the first 2 reasons, it won’t be relevant, and as long as you’re consistent in your diet, it won’t matter. However, you should...

8 Tips to not ruin your diet while eating out

  When dealing with people that want to lose weight, by far the most important variable is consistency. Consistency triumphs over anything else, and if you don’t have it, no matter how ideal or optimal your whole plan is, it’s going to fail. In my experience, the thing that often ruins consistency the most for my clients is eating out. They’re following their plan just fine, until a social event appears and they can’t track their food. Most of the time, they magically appear much heavier than usual. Of course some of it is water, but we both know the calories were way higher than what they should be. So here’s a few tips to avoid ruining your diet every time you eat out: 1) Abandon the black and white mentally This is biggest game-changer. This alone is half the article, but with a good reason: it’s by far the most important. When people eat-out and are unable to stick with their usual diet, they have the habit to think they’re off-diet, there’s nothing they can do, right? This is what makes it so problematic, and it’s a stupid way of thinking. It’s a logical fallacy normally referred to as false dilemma. It’s either black or white, one or zero, all or nothing. This is obviously not true, just because you can’t follow your diet perfectly, doesn’t mean you’re “off-diet”. People have a tendency to have this mentally in everything in life, but in the context of dieting it is especially bad. Let’s consider 2 different people, they both go to a family dinner. One has the off-diet mind-set,...